Diptyque candles

A bit of history: Candles have cast a light on man’s progress for centuries. However, there is very little known about the origin of candles. Although it is often written that the first candles were developed by the Ancient Egyptians who used rushlights, or torches, made by soaking the pithy core of reeds in molten tallow, the rushlights had no wick like a candle. It is the Romans who are credited with developing the wick candle, using it to aid travelers at dark, and lighting homes and places of worship at night.

Colonial women offered America’s first contribution to candlemaking when they discovered that boiling the grayish green berries of bayberry bushes produced a sweet-smelling wax that burned clean. However, extracting the wax from the bayberries was extremely tedious. As a result, the popularity of bayberry candles soon diminished.

It was during the 19th century when most major developments affecting contemporary candlemaking occurred. In 1834, inventor Joseph Morgan introduced a machine which allowed continuous production of molded candles by the use of a cylinder which featured a movable piston that ejected candles as they solidified.Further developments in candlemaking occurred in 1850 with the production of paraffin wax made from oil and coal shales.

Born as a fabric company in 1961 in  Saint Germain, by three artisans united by the passion for design, Diptyque became one of the most known boutiques in town. All the clients were given perfumed candles with each purchase  and soon most of the elite clients of the boutique fell in love with the colourful candles. The more the voice spreaded around, the more the clients asked for new candles to be added to the existing collections which brought the company to become one of the most important worldwide. Today several boutiques exist around the world where you can purchase candles, perfums and home fragrances which are the perfect gift.

http://www.diptyqueparis.com/

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